“…suffered under Pontius the Pirate, was crucified, died, and was buried.”
— I noticed tonight my 4 year old says the middle part of the Apostle’s Creed this way. (via chrysostmom)

(via lordlavendre)

theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY
theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY
theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY
theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY
theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY
theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY
theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY

theraccolta:

Hundreds of Relics at St. John Gualbert’s Roman Catholic Church – Cheektowaga, NY

(via lordlavendre)

the-garden-of-delights:

Kirsten Dunst in the title role of Marie Antoinette (2006).

the-garden-of-delights:

Kirsten Dunst in the title role of Marie Antoinette (2006).

(via lordlavendre)

theraccolta:

The Sacred Vessels and Items of the Sanctuary

(via lordlavendre)

sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

On a wooded hill (245m 804ft) called the Neroburg, above Wiesbaden stands a lovely Russian Orthodox Church topped with five gold domes making it visible for miles along the Rhine and Main River valleys. The church, dedicated to St Elizabeth mother of John the Baptist, was built from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau to serve as a burial shrine for his young wife, the 19-year-old Russian princess Elizabeth Mikhailovna, Grand Duchess of Russia and Duchess of Nassau (1826-1845), the daughter of Michael Romanov (1798-1849), younger brother of Tsar Alexander I (reigned 1801-1825) and Nicholas I (reigned 1826-1855). Adolf and Elizabeth were married in 1844, but the following year, she died in childbirth along with their newborn daughter. 
The church was used throughout the 19th century by Russian nobility on their visits to the popular spa city of Wiesbaden. A permanent worshiping community grew up around the church in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, with many emigres settling in Germany.  sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

On a wooded hill (245m 804ft) called the Neroburg, above Wiesbaden stands a lovely Russian Orthodox Church topped with five gold domes making it visible for miles along the Rhine and Main River valleys. The church, dedicated to St Elizabeth mother of John the Baptist, was built from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau to serve as a burial shrine for his young wife, the 19-year-old Russian princess Elizabeth Mikhailovna, Grand Duchess of Russia and Duchess of Nassau (1826-1845), the daughter of Michael Romanov (1798-1849), younger brother of Tsar Alexander I (reigned 1801-1825) and Nicholas I (reigned 1826-1855). Adolf and Elizabeth were married in 1844, but the following year, she died in childbirth along with their newborn daughter. 
The church was used throughout the 19th century by Russian nobility on their visits to the popular spa city of Wiesbaden. A permanent worshiping community grew up around the church in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, with many emigres settling in Germany.  sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

On a wooded hill (245m 804ft) called the Neroburg, above Wiesbaden stands a lovely Russian Orthodox Church topped with five gold domes making it visible for miles along the Rhine and Main River valleys. The church, dedicated to St Elizabeth mother of John the Baptist, was built from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau to serve as a burial shrine for his young wife, the 19-year-old Russian princess Elizabeth Mikhailovna, Grand Duchess of Russia and Duchess of Nassau (1826-1845), the daughter of Michael Romanov (1798-1849), younger brother of Tsar Alexander I (reigned 1801-1825) and Nicholas I (reigned 1826-1855). Adolf and Elizabeth were married in 1844, but the following year, she died in childbirth along with their newborn daughter. 
The church was used throughout the 19th century by Russian nobility on their visits to the popular spa city of Wiesbaden. A permanent worshiping community grew up around the church in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, with many emigres settling in Germany.  sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

On a wooded hill (245m 804ft) called the Neroburg, above Wiesbaden stands a lovely Russian Orthodox Church topped with five gold domes making it visible for miles along the Rhine and Main River valleys. The church, dedicated to St Elizabeth mother of John the Baptist, was built from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau to serve as a burial shrine for his young wife, the 19-year-old Russian princess Elizabeth Mikhailovna, Grand Duchess of Russia and Duchess of Nassau (1826-1845), the daughter of Michael Romanov (1798-1849), younger brother of Tsar Alexander I (reigned 1801-1825) and Nicholas I (reigned 1826-1855). Adolf and Elizabeth were married in 1844, but the following year, she died in childbirth along with their newborn daughter. 
The church was used throughout the 19th century by Russian nobility on their visits to the popular spa city of Wiesbaden. A permanent worshiping community grew up around the church in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, with many emigres settling in Germany.  sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

On a wooded hill (245m 804ft) called the Neroburg, above Wiesbaden stands a lovely Russian Orthodox Church topped with five gold domes making it visible for miles along the Rhine and Main River valleys. The church, dedicated to St Elizabeth mother of John the Baptist, was built from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau to serve as a burial shrine for his young wife, the 19-year-old Russian princess Elizabeth Mikhailovna, Grand Duchess of Russia and Duchess of Nassau (1826-1845), the daughter of Michael Romanov (1798-1849), younger brother of Tsar Alexander I (reigned 1801-1825) and Nicholas I (reigned 1826-1855). Adolf and Elizabeth were married in 1844, but the following year, she died in childbirth along with their newborn daughter. 
The church was used throughout the 19th century by Russian nobility on their visits to the popular spa city of Wiesbaden. A permanent worshiping community grew up around the church in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, with many emigres settling in Germany. 

sodomyandunpleasantaccents:

On a wooded hill (245m 804ft) called the Neroburg, above Wiesbaden stands a lovely Russian Orthodox Church topped with five gold domes making it visible for miles along the Rhine and Main River valleys. The church, dedicated to St Elizabeth mother of John the Baptist, was built from 1847 to 1855 by Duke Adolf of Nassau to serve as a burial shrine for his young wife, the 19-year-old Russian princess Elizabeth Mikhailovna, Grand Duchess of Russia and Duchess of Nassau (1826-1845), the daughter of Michael Romanov (1798-1849), younger brother of Tsar Alexander I (reigned 1801-1825) and Nicholas I (reigned 1826-1855). Adolf and Elizabeth were married in 1844, but the following year, she died in childbirth along with their newborn daughter. 

The church was used throughout the 19th century by Russian nobility on their visits to the popular spa city of Wiesbaden. A permanent worshiping community grew up around the church in the wake of the 1917 Russian Revolution, with many emigres settling in Germany. 

(via lordlavendre)

ibelieveinjimmoriarty:

This sums up my relationship with most people I know.
ibelieveinjimmoriarty:

This sums up my relationship with most people I know.
ibelieveinjimmoriarty:

This sums up my relationship with most people I know.
ibelieveinjimmoriarty:

This sums up my relationship with most people I know.

ibelieveinjimmoriarty:

This sums up my relationship with most people I know.

(via lordlavendre)

orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.
orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.

orthodoxdude24:

Orthodox Church of the Annunciation in Lowell, Massachusetts. Its filled from floor to ceiling entirely with mosaics that took 40 years to finish.

(via adaltaredei)

“It is however quite clear that the Bible does not aim to present a scientific account of the origins of the universe and it is rather naive to base one’s argument on a literal understanding of the Biblical Narative. Scripture regards all history from the perspective of the intterelationship between the human and divine. The authors of the Biblical narative often use metaphor and symbolic language and although they inevitably rely on the scientific knowledge of their own time, this does not diminish the significance of the Bible as a book through which God speaks to Humanity and reveals himself in all his creative power.”
— p52, Metropolitan Hilarion Alfeyev, ‘The Mystery of Faith. (via theorthodoxbritreturns)

(via adaltaredei)